How to Make Black Garlic


If you've eaten at an upscale restaurant lately, you may have seen black garlic on the menu. Black garlic is whole garlic that's kept warm for a few weeks so it turns black and develops a woodsy, sweet flavor. You can easily make as much black garlic as you like in a rice cooker. Then experiment with the unique flavor by adding black garlic to your pasta, salads, and roasted meats.

Part 1
Aging the Garlic

Aging the Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

1
Buy as many heads of garlic as you'd like to make. Try to buy solo garlic, which is a single, large clove of garlic, instead of several cloves separated by papery skin. Although you can use standard garlic, it may be easier to use the black garlic if it's a single clove.[1] Some grocery stores may call solo garlic "pearl garlic." Discard garlic that's cracked or has already started to sprout from the top because these will be bitter.

Aging the Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

2
Because you're not going to peel the garlic before it ages, ensure that it's clean and free from dirt. Dip a paper towel in water and wring out most of the liquid. Then gently brush the outside of each garlic head to remove the dirt. Discard any heads of garlic that feel mushy or are rotting.

Aging the Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

3
Set a rice cooker on the counter and put a small rack in the bottom of the cooker. You can use a bamboo rack or mat. Then place a paper towel on the rack.[2] Your rice cooker needs to have a lid that seals shut and a Keep Warm setting. If you don't have a rice cooker like this, use a slow cooker on the low setting.

Aging the Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

4
Arrange the cleaned heads of garlic on the paper towel in the rice cooker. You can put as many heads of garlic in as you like since they don't need to be in a single layer.[3] Because it takes so long to age black garlic, it's a good idea to make a large batch.

Aging the Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

5
Lay 1 or 2 paper towels over the heads of garlic so they're covered with the paper. Then close the lid of the rice cooker and press down firmly so it's secure.[4]Tip: Making black garlic willcause your house to smell likegarlic for almost 2 weeks. If youprefer, put the rice cooker inthe garage or outside while youage the garlic.Tip: Making black garlic will causeyour house to smell like garlic foralmost 2 weeks. If you prefer, put therice cooker in the garage or outsidewhile you age the garlic.Tip: Making black garlic will cause yourhouse to smell like garlic for almost 2weeks. If you prefer, put the rice cooker inthe garage or outside while you age thegarlic.Tip: Making black garlic will cause your house to smell like garlic foralmost 2 weeks. If you prefer, put the rice cooker in the garage oroutside while you age the garlic.Tip: Making black garlic will cause your house to smell like garlic for almost2 weeks. If you prefer, put the rice cooker in the garage or outside while youage the garlic.

Aging the Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

6
Turn the rice cooker on to the Keep Warm setting, not the rice cook setting. Leave the garlic to warm for 10 full days. To keep track of the days, consider sticking a note on the cooker with the final day listed.[5] Keep in mind that making black garlic in the rice cooker will permanently make the cooker smell like garlic. Some rice cookers have an Extended Keep Warm function. If yours does, use this or you'll need to repeatedly turn the machine back on. Read your manufacturer's instructions to determine the safest way to leave the machine on for 10 days.

Aging the Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

7
Open the rice cooker to check the garlic. Peel a head of garlic to see if it's completely black. Squeeze the garlic so you can tell if it's dry. Turn off the rice cooker and take out the garlic once the heads are firm to the touch and black.[6] If the heads of garlic are still moist and a little squishy, leave them in the rice cooker on the Keep Warm setting for up to 4 more days.

Part 2
Storing and Using Black Garlic

Storing and Using Black Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

1
Once the black garlic is cool, put the unpeeled heads into an airtight container. Place the container in the pantry and use the black garlic within 6 months.[7] Avoid refrigerating the black garlic because this will introduce moisture that could cause the garlic to spoil.

Storing and Using Black Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

2
Peel a few heads of the black garlic and put the garlic into a mortar. Drizzle about 1 teaspoon (4.9 ml) of olive oil over the garlic and pound it with the pestle until you get a smooth paste. Blend in more olive oil if you'd like a thinner consistency.[8] To use the paste, spread it on crostini, whisk it into salad dressing, or smear it on chicken before you roast it.

Storing and Using Black Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

3
Peel several heads of garlic and place the cloves on the rack of a dehydrator. Dehydrate the black garlic at 140 °F (60 °C) for 24 to 36 hours or until they're completely dry and they feel light. Then grind them in a food processor until you have a fine powder.[9]Tip: Since the seasoning isquickly absorbed by liquid, it'sgreat in sauces, soup, and curry.Tip: Since the seasoning is quicklyabsorbed by liquid, it's great insauces, soup, and curry.Tip: Since the seasoning is quickly absorbedby liquid, it's great in sauces, soup, andcurry.Tip: Since the seasoning is quickly absorbed by liquid, it's great insauces, soup, and curry.Tip: Since the seasoning is quickly absorbed by liquid, it's great in sauces,soup, and curry.Add black garlic powder to marinades, spice rubs for beef, or pasta sauce.

Storing and Using Black Garlic on How to Make Black Garlic

4
If you'd like to add a burst of black garlic's savory-sweet flavor, slice the peeled black garlic as thinly as you can. Scatter a few slices over your favorite cooked pasta or tossed salad.[10] The black garlic makes a striking garnish, especially if it's on a pale pasta, such as fettuccine alfredo.