How to Stop Stuttering


There are no instant miracle cures for stuttering. Therapy, electronic devices, and even drugs can't help make it an overnight process. Those who stutter, however, can fight the condition on their own, as well as make significant progress toward fluency by seeing a speech therapist. If you're serious about putting stuttering behind you and beginning your new, more-fluent life, read these tips and techniques.

Part 1
Home Treatments

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

1
.. Tell yourself that you really are going to do fine. When you are worried that you are going to stutter, you make it likelier that you will. Relax both your body and your mind.[1] Relax your body: Release the tension in your back, neck and arms. Relax your shoulders; let them sink down to a natural level. Buzz your lips for a couple seconds before you start speaking. Singers do this sometimes to warm up. Shake out any tension that you have in your legs and arms. Twist your torso. Relax your mind: Tell yourself: "I am bigger than this stutter; this stutter is not bigger than me!" Don't tell yourself it's a life or death situation. Stuttering is annoying, but it's not as much of an issue to other people as it probably is to you. Let this thought relax you. Concentrate your attention inside your head. Gently let your attention drift to the furthest tips of your body, breathing evenly. This can be done as a form of meditation.

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

2
While this will only lessen the severity of your stutter, it will help increase your confidence when putting yourself in real-world situations. Remember it is better to confront your problems than to hide from them. Feign stuttering. While this may seem awkward at first, voluntary stuttering can help relieve the tension of stuttering. Just have fun with it, and realize that your situation may not be as bad as it seems. Practice by stuttering over the syllables that you have trouble the most. Like, for example, if you have a hard time with the hard 'c', say, "I am g-going to c-c-cook dinner." Breathe, talk slowly, and pause. Formulate your thoughts and then deliberate them clearly. If you find you're about to trip on your words, just pause. Take a breath, and then say the next phrase. Pause once again, and then finish your sentence. If you're stuck on a word while pausing, and you feel that the other person is going to interrupt, please ask him or her nicely to let you finish. Interrupting someone by guessing what the word can demonstrate impatience and inconsideration, and can only discourage you more.[2]

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

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Just start talking about anything — how your day went, what you're feeling like, what you're planning on eating later on — and watch your stutter disappear.[3] Of course, talking in front of the mirror isn't the same thing as talking to another person, but this exercise should give you a good boost of confidence. Remember how well you spoke to yourself in the mirror when preparing to talk to somebody else. Try speaking to yourself every day for 30 minutes. It might seem weird at first, but the exercise is hearing your voice without the stutter. It'll give you lots of confidence.

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

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Your charisma skills will be improved. Just read out loud. It's going to be hard at first, but it will teach you how to breathe. One big problem most stutters have is knowing when to breathe while reading or talking while also giving you practice on recovering from stuttering.[4]

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

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This is hard to master, but it really helps. If you can imagine words, you claim them and it'll be harder for them to slip into a stutter. If you cannot imagine it, they can't be yours. Have a clear mental picture of what you want to say.[5] If you are stumbling over a particular word, try using a word that has a similar meaning— a synonym. This word might be easier to use and one that you won't slip over. Try to spell a word out if you stumble over it. You might have to pronounce it very slowly and letter by letter, but at least you'll get the satisfaction of knowing that you pronounced it. Don't be afraid to pause as you visualize or spell out the letters in the word. We're trained to think of silences as frightening; you have to train yourself to think of the silences as opportunities to ace it.

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

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Work through stuttering by letting out deep, guttural noises at each block. For example: "It's s-s-s-s-s-. GRRRRRR It's silly." Try stopping by saying "Blah " or Aa and continue.

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

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Before you go to talk, get optimistic instead of pessimistic. Often times, the fear of stuttering can cause stuttering itself. Instead of fearing it and expecting it to happen, try to visualize succeeding. This will help you destroy any nervousness you might encounter.

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

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Often, a stutterer will have trouble breathing while they are stuttering. Getting your speech back could be helped drastically by doing breathing exercises.[6] Try these for more fluency while you speak: Take a couple of deep breaths before you start speaking. Pretend you're diving down into water and you need to get a couple of deep breaths before you dive. This may ease your breathing and help regulate it. If you're in a social situation and you feel uncomfortable doing this, try to breathe deeply through your nose. Remember to breathe when you speak and if you stutter. People who stutter often forget to breathe once they begin stuttering. Pause, give yourself some time to breathe, and try to tackle the word or phrase again. Don't try to set any speed records. There are plenty of fast talkers out there, but the goal is not to speak how they speak. Your goal is to be able to express words and be understood. Learn to speak at a moderate pace. There is no rush here, nor are there competitions on who can out talk the other person.

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

9
People who stutter tend to lose their stutter when they sing, for several reasons: the words they are singing are prolonged, and the voice they use is smooth and delivered easier than normal speech. If you can put a little bit of rhythm into your speech (give it an oratory quality, like Martin Luther King, Jr.) you might find that your stutter has lessened or even gone away.[7]

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

10
Look over people's heads, or at a point in the back of the room. This way, you might not get as nervous and start a chain reaction of stuttering. If you're talking directly to someone, see if you can make regular eye contact with them. You don't have to stare at them the whole time, but making eye contact with them will put them at ease, which will help you feel more comfortable.[8]

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

11
Understand that you'll make mistakes. But it's not the mistakes that define you. It's how you rebound from the mistakes, how you persevere. Understand that you will probably lose some battles, but that your goal is to win the war.

Home Treatments on How to Stop Stuttering

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Even if people think poorly of you,you can't let their thoughts affect your mind.

Part 2
What Parents Should and Shouldn't Do

What Parents Should and Shouldn't Do on How to Stop Stuttering

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Parents who express too much concern about their child who stutters risk alienating the child and making him or her feel more self-conscious about the stutter. This will harm the child's progress more than help.[9]

What Parents Should and Shouldn't Do on How to Stop Stuttering

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Putting the child in stressful social situations so that they can learn to be "comfortable" will backfire.[10]

What Parents Should and Shouldn't Do on How to Stop Stuttering

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When a child stutters, let them finish their thoughts without interrupting them and finishing the words for them. Show love and acceptance to them when they stutter.[11]

What Parents Should and Shouldn't Do on How to Stop Stuttering

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If your child wants to talk about it, set aside time to discuss what they might be going through, and to discuss options in treating the stutter. Let your child know that you understand their frustration.[12]

What Parents Should and Shouldn't Do on How to Stop Stuttering

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Listen to any other recommendations the speech therapist might have.

Part 3
Seeing a Speech Therapist

Seeing a Speech Therapist on How to Stop Stuttering

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Most stutters will go away after some time, especially if the stutterer is young. Seeing a speech therapist is recommended in some cases, however, especially those cases when the stutterer is depressed or views the stutter as a significant roadblock in their lives.

Seeing a Speech Therapist on How to Stop Stuttering

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There are situations where therapy may be beneficial, and situations where it may not be.[13] Speech therapy can help a child if: The stuttering itself has lasted more than 6 months The blocked speech lasts more than several seconds There is a family history of stuttering The child is emotionally drained, embarrassed, or depressed about their stutter.

Seeing a Speech Therapist on How to Stop Stuttering

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Speech therapists often put patients through a series of vocal training sessions in an effort to lessen the impact of the stutter on communication, not so much cure the disruptions themselves.[14] Patients then practice these techniques in real life situations. Speech therapists may wish to talk to parents, teachers, and sometimes even friends in an effort to communicate their techniques and help them understand what the patient is trying to achieve. They do this so that patients receive help and understanding from the people around them when they speak outside the confines of therapy.

Seeing a Speech Therapist on How to Stop Stuttering

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Hundreds of stuttering support groups exist worldwide. A speech therapist, after consulting with a patient, may find it beneficial to try attending a support group, where a person who stutters is less likely to find therapy techniques and more likely to find opportunity to bond with others in a non-threatening environment.[15]